Legislation


Legislation can have many purposes: to regulate, to authorize, to proscribe, to provide (funds), to sanction, to grant, to declare or to restrict. The most common forms of legislation IOGCC concerns itself with are resolutions, bills and statutes.

Resolutions: The “official expression of the opinion or will of a legislative body.” Resolutions can be issued by federal, state, and interstate forms of government.  Other entities, such as associations and nonprofit entities comprised of regulatory officials, will issue resolutions to demonstrate policy positions. In the case of the IOGCC, resolutions are issued as an interstate form of government.

IOGCC Resolutions: IOGCC Resolutions represent the collective voice of the governors of the member and associate member states of the IOGCC.  IOGCC resolutions reflect the official position of the commission on issues that are deemed critical to conserving domestic oil and natural gas, environmental protection and human health.

Bills: Before an item of legislation becomes law it is known as a “bill.” Bills are offered before legislative bodies for debate. An “appropriations bill” authorizes government expenditures; an “engrossed bill” is ready for final passage or passed by one house of the legislature; an “enrolled bill” is passed by both houses of the legislature; a “revenue bill” levies or raises taxes; “house” and “senate” bills are bills under consideration by their respective entities, while “joint” bills are sponsored by both entities.

Statutes: A “statute” is a formal written enactment or of a legislative body or “law.” Additionally, legislation generates: (1) Committee hearings, reports, documents and committee prints; (2) Floor Debates; and (3) Separately bound legislative histories. (Black’s 1990)

IOGCC Resolutions

Resolution 09.011

Resolution 09.011 Urging Congress Not To Remove Exemption Of Hydraulic Fracturing From Provisions Of The Safe Drinking Water Act
In January 2009, IOGCC member states passed Resolution 09.011 urging Congress not to remove the exemption of hydraulic fracturing from provisions of the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA) because of their firmly held belief that the process is already adequately regulated by the states.

Resolution 03.101

Resolution 03.101 Urging Congress to Correctly Characterize Hydraulic Fracturing for Purposes of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Resolution 01.121

Resolution 01.121 Urging Congress to Enact Legislation to Correctly Characterize Hydraulic Fracturing for Purposes of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Resolution 99.603

Resolution 99.603 Urging Congress to Enact S. 724 to Correctly Characterize Hydraulic Fracturing for Purposes  of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

State Legislation

Individual State Resolutions

Hydraulic Fracturing Resolutions passed by individual states. In January 2009, IOGCC member states passed Resolution 09.011 urging Congress not to remove the exemption of hydraulic fracturing from provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) because of their firmly held belief that the process is already adequately regulated by the states. Since that time, six IOGCC member states passed similar resolutions at the state level. Download the full text of state resolutions

Hydraulic Fracturing Resolutions Fact Sheet (2009)

Fact Sheet - State Hydraulic Fracturing Resolutions, IOGCC (2009). In January 2009, IOGCC member states passed Resolution 09.011 urging Congress not to remove the exemption of hydraulic fracturing from provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) because of their firmly held belief that the process is already adequately regulated by the states. Since that time, six IOGCC member states passed similar resolutions at the state level. This easy-to-read fact sheet provides an overview of individual state resolutions regarding hydraulic fracturing.

Federal Legislation

EPACT Section 322

Section 322 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPA) exempts hydraulic fraction from the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA).

Other Resolutions

Resolution Supporting State Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing, NARUC (2009)

National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, July 22, 2009. At its 2009 Summer Committee Meeting, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners resolved that states should remain the source of regulations for hydraulic fracturing.