New Energy Technologies: Regulating Change


This site shares state experiences and their ability to share information on the most current oil and natural gas regulatory topics. Read More


Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  • CO2 Capture & Storage

    Potential CO2 Sequestration Reservoirs and Products

    Red lines indicate CO2 being pumped into the reservoirs for sequestration, green lines indicate enhanced recovery of fossil fuels caused by CO2 sequestration, and the blue line indicates conventional recovery of fossil fuels.

  • CO2 Capture & Storage

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    The U.S. DOE NETL has formed a nationwide network of regional partnerships to help determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) are a government/industry effort tasked with determining the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure needs for carbon capture, storage, and sequestration in different areas of the country. The seven partnerships that comprise the RCSPs represent more than 500 organizations in 40 states, three Indian nations, and four Canadian provinces.

  • CO2 Capture & Storage

    Pipeline Diameter - CO2 Flow Rate

    Pipeline diameters are calculated using rigorous iterative calculations, but estimations correlating pipeline diameter and CO2 flow rates can be made. This chart shows such an estimation made by MIT.

  • CO2 Capture & Storage

    Existing or Planned CO2 Pipelines in the United States

    Approximately 4,000 miles of CO2 pipelines have been constructed in the U.S. These pipelines have been built through a variety of business models (open access, dedicated access, interstate, and intrastate) but each follows a private sector model, with limited government involvement from either a regulatory or financial standpoint. The yellow lines represent proposed CO2 pipelines. The white lines represent existing CO2 pipelines.

  • Quotee

    Hydraulic Fracturing

    As the head regulator of oil and natural gas development in the state of North Dakota and an officer of the IOGCC representing all oil and natural gas producing state regulators, I can assure you that we have no higher priority than the protection of our states' water resources.
    - Lynn Helms, Director, Department of Mineral Resources, North Dakota Industrial Commission
  • Quotee

    Hydraulic Fracturing

    By passing this legislation [FRAC Act]... EPA will then likely set redundant construction guidelines and testing standards that will merely create duplicate reporting and testing requirements with no benefit to the environment.
    - Cathy Foerster, Commissioner, AOGCC
  • Quotee

    Hydraulic Fracturing

    There have been no instances where the Division of Oil and Gas has verified that harm to groundwater has ever been found to be the result of hydraulic fracturing in Indiana.
    - Herschel McDivitt, Director, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas
  • Quotee

    Hydraulic Fracturing

    It is my firmly held view and that of IOGCC that the subject of hydraulic fracturing is adequately regulated by the states and needs no further study.
    - Lynn Helms, Director, Department of Mineral Resources, North Dakota Industrial Commission
  • Quotee

    Hydraulic Fracturing

    Regulating oil and gas exploration and production activities, including hydraulic fracturing, has traditionally been the province of the states, which have had effective programs in place for decades.
    - Victor G. Carrillo, Chairman, Railroad Commission of Texas
  • Supporting Chart

    Carbon Sequestration

    Legislation surrounding carbon sequestration is a timely issue in the oil and natural gas industry. Many states are using their experience to help craft regulations for the responsible capturing and storage of this resource. This map shows the states which have, or are currently developing, carbon legislation.

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  • Quotee

    Carbon Sequestration

    It is critical that the eventual CO2 storage regulatory framework treat CO2 as a natural resource to be managed, much like oil and natural gas, rather than as a waste or pollutant in need of disposal. Treating CO2 as anything other than the natural resource it is will make CO2 unnecessarily difficult to deal with.
    - Lawrence E. Bengal, Director, Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission
  • Quotee

    Carbon Sequestration

    In Texas, CO2 is and will always be a commodity. For over 30 years, we have exploited the commercial benefits of CO2 and will continue to do so. By provided a regulatory framework for geologic storage, Texas is prepared to address potential carbon mitigation policies, thus opening a new chapter in the commercial viability of ways to use and process CO2.
    - Darrick Eugene, General Counsel, Texas Carbon Capture and Storage Association
  • Quotee

    Shale Gas

    States have successfully worked with stakeholders on a variety of regulatory issues associated with this development
    - David Neslin, Director, Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission
  • Quotee

    Shale Gas

    States have the ability to quickly react, modify and enhance their regulatory approach to meet emerging concerns.
    - Ron Gilius, Director, Pennsylvania Bureau of Oil and Gas Management
  • Quotee

    Shale Gas

    States have the regulatory framework, the technical expertise, and the people on the ground to effectively regulate shale gas development and protect the environment and public health and safety
    - Lori Wrotenbery, Director, Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division
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    Orphaned Wells

    Plugging - State Waiting List*

    In 1992 states reported 21,155 wells to be plugged. This number continued growing through the 90s and into the 2000s. The latest numbers from the 2008 survey reveals 55,666 well sites on the waiting list to be plugged.

    * Most recent statistics to date. Subject to change. Some state information in process.

  • Image 02

    Orphaned Wells

    2008 Quick Stats*

    • A total of 2,920 orphaned wells were plugged across the U.S. in 2008
    • A total of $33,229,958 was spent to plug wells in 2008.
    • The average cost of plugging a well was $11,380 in 2008.
    • Texas spent the most ($14,665,175), plugging 1,337 wells in 2008.

    * Most recent statistics to date. Subject to change. Some state information in process.